Preservation and Sustainability: Could the Concept of Using What We Have Be Gaining Traction?

This Oregonian editorial draws attention once again to the connections between sustainability and historic preservation: “Use what we have”. In recent months Metro has begun talking about this concept, albeit more broadly. Last September, Metro COO Michael Jordan announced his Strategies for a Sustainable and Prosperous Region. We can only hope that these actions lead to positive results in the preservation of our communities and traditional neighborhoods.

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3 Comments

Filed under Historic Preservation, Local History, Modernism + The Recent Past, Schools, Sustainability

3 responses to “Preservation and Sustainability: Could the Concept of Using What We Have Be Gaining Traction?

  1. This topic was also featured earlier in the week in a discussion on the Portland Architecture Blog.
    http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341c86d053ef01310fabc485970c

  2. I understand the desire to make the link between ‘sustainability’, which has a passionate following in the area, with historic preservation (which can be cool), but sustainability isn’t usually one of even the first three things I consider when I believe buildings ought to be preserved. I worry pushing that angle might leave historic buildings vulnerable, despite arguments about stored energy, etc., to people who want to knock down and build some LEEDS building in recompense

    • useitorlooseit

      Preserving an historic building is the ultimate recycling. We are not only keeping the stored energy intact, we are keeping it out of the landfills. Sustainability is not just a new buzz word, but the heart of historic preservation. As a professional preservationist, I do not preserve a building because of its beauty, but because of it structural integrity and life expectancy. Look at the Montgomery Wards building as a great example.

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